DNA pills

What is pharmacogenomics?

… and how can clinicians take advantage of advances in genomics to better predict how their patient will respond to medication?
microbe-bacteria

Love bugs? Here’s five key facts about the microbiome

The DNA in your body doesn’t just come from you, thanks to the many millions of bacteria, virus and other cells that reside in you and on you

Rare disease, genomics and the future

In the run-up to Rare Disease Day, we outline what constitutes ‘rare’ and how genomics is used in diagnosis and management

Direct-to-consumer genetic tests at an all-time high…

… but how can healthcare professionals make sure they are equipped to support patients who are worried and distressed about their results?  

Genome editing: Talking to patients

With genome editing hitting the headlines, patients may have questions about its applications. Here’s our concise guide for health professionals

Earlobe genetics pierces the monogenic myth

Your earlobe shape was thought to be controlled by a single gene – until genome sequencing revealed otherwise. What other misconceptions will be uncovered?
Genomics lab

Genome editing: 5 key questions answered

News stories in biomedicine are being dominated by genome editing, Crispr and other methods. So what's it all about, and what might it mean for healthcare?

Nutrigenomics: 5 facts about your genes, diet and health

As nutrigenomics edges nearer to the mainstream, are we any closer to preventing disease through dietary changes?

Various types of variant: what is genomic variation?

The diversity of differences in our genomes and their complex relationship with health and disease

The rise of consumer genetic testing

As home DNA testing kits increase in popularity, the widened range of testing prompts consideration of scientific accuracy and value

Genome sequencing - past, present and future

How has sequencing evolved? And will whole genome sequencing replace other technologies as clinicians’ go-to diagnostic test?

Epigenetics – the real key to everything?

It isn't all in the code. Gene alterations play a part in disease, but gene expression may ultimately prove equally - if not more - important