Blog articles


Genomics and HIV: can we be cured?

New genomic discoveries provide hope that lifelong antiretroviral therapy may one day be a thing of the past

Infectious diseases and the race to diagnosis

Researchers are exploring new techniques to tackle serious infectious diseases, and contain an outbreak before it becomes an epidemic

HIV and the genome

Genome editing has not been without controversies, but some studies suggest it may hold the cure for patients living with HIV

Genomics, the land, and the promise of new drugs

Despite its proven value, scientists and researchers are yet to harness the full medical potential of the soil. Is genomics the key?
Fertilisation IVF

Birth of world’s first gene-edited babies sparks outcry

Why is the procedure so controversial, what are the risks, and could it ever happen in the UK? We take a look at the key issues

First RNA-based therapy approved in US and Europe

Gene-silencing technique works without altering the person’s DNA, and prevents harmful proteins from being made in their cells  

Genome editing: Talking to patients

With genome editing hitting the headlines, patients may have questions about its applications. Here’s our concise guide for health professionals
Genomics lab

Genome editing: 5 key questions answered

News stories in biomedicine are being dominated by genome editing, Crispr and other methods. So what's it all about, and what might it mean for healthcare?

World first with genome edited inside patient’s body

Experimental procedure has potential for treating several metabolic disorders, but the long-term risks are yet to be fully understood

Ethical editing: therapeutics and ‘enhancement’

A newly published report takes a different approach towards the controversial editing of human genomes

How genome editing could enter mainstream medicine

Forget designer babies and novelty pets. The potential for genome editing to improve the health of the general population is already emerging

Genomics in government policy

How do we bring exciting research, exceptional medicine and public opinion to routine clinical practice?