Whole genome sequencing drives progress in cancer

A new study into metastatic cancers highlights the significant potential for WGS in deepening understanding of the disease and improving treatment options

Direct-to-consumer testing: a clinician's guide

In the second of our articles this week on DTC genetic tests, guest author Dr Rachel Horton explains some of the common pitfalls and the key points clinicians need to know

2020 vision: genomic predictions for the year ahead

Three wise women and men ponder the question of what might be in store in the world of genomics this year

Back to the future of ophthalmology: 5 predictions

We take a look back at a bold paper published in 1999, 'Ophthalmology in the post-genomic era' to see how accurate its authors' predictions really were

Genomic sequencing in childhood cancer

As the NHS prepares to roll out genomic testing for all children with cancer, we look at the power of genomics in selecting and trialling new targeted therapies

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Survival rates for breast cancer are better than ever, but what can a focus on genomics bring to the table?

Genomics and listeria

A look at the application of genomic sequencing in the management, and potential prevention, of an infectious outbreak

Long-read sequencing: the next next generation?

The ability to accurately sequence large sections of DNA is important in some areas of healthcare, and is enabling progress in others

Newborn screening: time to expand the list?

Genetic Alliance UK’s newborn screening patient charter sets out why the UK should extend its programme - and establish a pilot for genome sequencing at birth

Understanding pleiotropy

We explore one of the many phenomena that show genomics to be far more complex than the ‘one gene per characteristic’ rule

Meet the mitochondria

You’ve heard of the genome – our complete set of DNA – but do you know about mitochondrial DNA and its relevance to health?

Pharmacogenomics: mechanisms of action

We know that different people react differently to drugs. But how does this actually happen? And where does genomics come in?